Keep resistance alive in 2018

| Federal Income Tax,National,NWTRCC News

Just a brief post this week!

  • "I know first hand how hard NWTRCC's coordinators work to spread the word about war tax resistance and to create and provide resources. All this work requires money to continue." - Peter Smith and Ellyn SteckerPlease support the National War Tax Resistance Coordinating Committee with a generous donation by December 31! We want to keep going strong in 2018, able to address new events and concerns in the struggle against war – but also keep up our solid work in providing community and support for resisters! Your donation will help a lot.
  • The War Tax Resisters Penalty Fund announced that they received no requests for assistance in 2016. I would call this shocking, but it seems like resisters just aren’t being collected on lately. Success! But if people need this fund and aren’t using it, that’s no success. To support resisters in the future by contributing to reimburse them for collected interest and penalties – or to apply for support if you have been collected on – please check out the Penalty Fund website.
  • The House and Senate tax bills have been stirring up a lot of conversation lately. The weekend the tax bill passed the Senate, there was a small uptick in interest in tax resistance. People were finding our website, reading up, and sharing our website on social media! Exciting! We hope that more people will find us and discover what the military has been doing with our taxes all along.
  • I’d wished that more of the same people were paying attention when the $700 billion military budget was approved by a solid majority of Republicans and Democrats. If you’re not in the military, targeted by militarized police, or otherwise connected to the military or military-industrial complex in an explicit way, it may not be clear how militarism affects you. But tax cuts, credits, and increases feel immediate, personal, and tangible. It may also seem easier to target a specific bill than an entire system of state violence. But I think some of the most powerful war tax resister stories make those connections – to their personal or family experiences. How can we we tell good stories about war tax resistance in 2018?

Post by Erica Leigh